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20121201
20121231
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town about 60 miles northeast of new york city. the death toll at the sandy hook elementary school stands at 26, including 20 children, some of them kindergarteners. and the principal of the school was killed as well. the gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, armed with two handguns, opened fire in the kindergarten classroom where his mother was a teacher. her body was found later at her home. after the shootings, the police say adam lanza took his own life at the school. jim axelrod tells us how it all unfolded. jim? >> reporter: well, scott, it was just before -- just after 9:00 this morning at the sandy hook elementary school, which is right down the road here, a kindergarten through fourth grade school, so early this kids were still delivering their attendance list from their classrooms to the main office. as we say, a little after 9:00, the gunman apparently walked into the school and started shooting. police got 911 calls and kids could hear screaming coming over the intercom. the school was quickly placed on lockdown. teachers locking doors, pulling shades, keeping kids away from
. >> reporter: dr. jeffrey steinberg is the medical director of the fertility institutes in los angeles and new york city. >> we have chromosome 21 lit up in red. >> reporter: the team uses an expensive high-tech approach to select sex. it's called preimplantation genetic diagnosis or pgd for short. >> the accuracy in our program has been 100%. we're on thousands of cases now. we have never, ever missed a correct gender. >> reporter: in his lab, fertilized embryos are genetically analyzed. only those with the desired sex rim planted into the mother's uterus. dr. steinberg says a growing number of couples from the bay area use his services. >> the numbers keep going up and up and up. >> reporter: dr. steinberg says in his experience just as many want a girl as a boy. even so, the use of the technology troubles dr. marcy darnofski. >> now we have a way to do it. the question is, should we? >> reporter: she is associate director at the center for genetics in society in berkeley. she says when a couple spends thousands of dollars to produce a boy or a girl, they want results. >> what if the child d
for the big new year's eve ball drop at times square in new york city. today workers installed waterford crystal triangles on the ceremonial ball. more than a billion people across the world expected to watch the ball drop on tv. >>> for the cost of a postage stamp a group of bay area women received a priceless gift. cbs 5 reporter juliette goodrich explains how it all started with a discovery in the thrift store. >> these five cards must have somehow gotten mixed in. >> reporter: pam rousseau was at a thrift store in hayward when she found five cards sealed with handwritten addresses but no stamp. they were tucked away on a lower back shelf. >> the handwriting was scribbly and i wasn't sure if it might be an elderly person or... >> reporter: so she put stamps on them with a note attached explaining who she was and where she had found the letters. this card that pam put a stamp on made its way to the home in alameda. only as we find out, this card was supposed to have been sent five years ago to mary ann. >> and i opened it up and saw sue bunker's name and right away, i hit that, a card
with the average pay for state workers at more than $60,000 a year. new york ranks number 2 at $56,000. and new jersey right behind at $54,000. then there are the extreme examples. bloomberg reports one prison psychiatrist made more than $800,000 last year and a chp division chief retired with more than $483,000 with salary, pension and other exceptions. >> that's a lot. >> reporter: reaction on the street today was unanimous. >> definitely something should be done about that. >> even if those examples are not representative of the broader state employee population, it's the kind of thing that leaves a mark and resonates with the voters. >> reporter: at usc's unruh institute of politics, a professor points out this story comes just one month after california voters were convinced the state was so broke, that a tax increase was necessary to pay for the beleaguered public school system. >> next time there's an initiative on the ballot here in los angeles or statewide, or the next time a viewer sees a story on your station about public employee benefits, they are going to remember this story. that
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4